The most popular Dog Breeds

Dog Breeds is a particular strain of dog that was purposefully bred by humans to perform specific tasks, such as herding, hunting, and guarding. Dogs are the most variable mammal on earth, with artificial selection producing around 450 globally recognized breeds.

Portuguese Water Dog.

A cute brown and white dog lies on the sand at the beach resting and panting.

Portuguese water dogs were originally bred to herd fish, retrieve lost tackle or broken nets, and act as couriers from ship to shore.
They’re good for people with allergies and make excellent companions since they are loving, independent, intelligent, and easy to train. Portuguese water dogs also enjoy being petted and are friendly with strangers. Just be warned that like many larger dogs, boredom can cause them to become destructive.

American Pit Bull Terrier.

Two Pit bulls terriers watching each other head to head.

The American Pit Bull Terrier is not presently recognized on the AKC’s dog breed list, and many other countries have imposed breed restrictions or banned ownership. Their energy and strength means they can excel at many dog sports such as weight pulling.

Rottweiler’s.

Portrait of a Rottweiler dog with space for copy

Rotties were used in Germany to herd livestock – their primary use was to pull carts containing meat to markets. Around the world, rottweilers are now used as search and rescue dogs, police dogs and guard dogs.

Dobermann.

Dobermann (Doberman Pinscher)

Also known as the Doberman Pinscher, this breed was developed by a German tax collector – Karl Friedrich Louis Dobermann – in the late nineteenth century. Personalities can vary between each individual dog, and owning one requires dedication and commitment. With regular training, they are quick learners.

French Bulldog.

With their trademark bat ears and a playful disposition, Frenchies are a popular choice for a family pet. They tend to be fairly quiet and are friendly with strangers and animals alike, sometimes requiring a great deal of attention. These smaller dogs do not require a lot of outdoor exercise and can struggle in warmer weather.
The Frenchie dates back to the late 1800s, when lace-makers in England relocated to the north of France with their toy-size Bulldogs. The dogs were crossed with other breeds and eventually made their way to Paris, where they became synonymous with the cafe culture and city life. Their popularity led them across Europe and to the United States throughout the twentieth century.

Siberian Husky.

Siberian Huskies have famously been used to pull sleds over frozen landscapes. These strikingly beautiful working dogs have distinctive blue or brown eyes and are usually good-natured and playful. Their inherent energy means they require ample room to run around, otherwise they can become destructive.
These dogs were used by the Chukchi people of northeastern Asia to pull loads in freezing temperatures across difficult terrains. Despite weighing between fifty and sixty pounds, Siberian Huskies are powerful creatures. They recently experienced a surge in popularity due to their similarity to the fictional direwolves featured in Game of Thrones.

German Shepherd.

Sometimes abbreviated to GSD, the German Shepherd is a medium-to-large sized working dog with a striking, wolf-like appearance. This working breed consistently places in second on the AKC list – with our research showing it is the same story on a worldwide scale. These large and agile dogs have extremely high intelligence and are loyal, brave and confident. GSDs are renowned for their character, with their loyalty and courage almost unmatched amongst canines. They can be trained for almost any task – German Shepherds are great family pets, reliable guard dogs, trained for police and military work, amongst a plethora of other jobs.

Dalmatian.

The Dalmatian is a breed of medium-sized dog, noted for its unique white coat marked with black or brown-colored spots. Originating as a hunting dog, it was also used as a carriage dog in its early days. The origins of this breed can be traced back to present-day Croatia and its historical region of Dalmatia. It is thought that early ancestors of the breed were certain breeds of pointers and a spotted Great Dane. Today, it is a popular family pet and many dog enthusiasts enter Dalmatians into kennel club competitions.